Frutta | Oliver Osborne, Otto
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Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Frutta, Rome

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Installation View

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Frutta, Rome

Oliver Osborne, Untitled, 2013, Silkscreen, Paper and Oil on Linen, 224 x 132 cm, 220 x 140 cm

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Frutta, Rome

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Installation View

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Frutta, Rome

Oliver Osborne, A Piano Competition, 2013, Silkscreen, Paper and Oil on Linen, 130 x 92 cm

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Frutta, Rome

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Installation View

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Frutta, Rome

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Installation View

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Frutta, Rome

Oliver Osborne, Untitled, 2013, Silkscreen, Paper and Oil on Linen, 225 x 132 cm, 230 x 136 cm

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Installation View

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Frutta, Rome

Oliver Osborne, Rubber Plant (¿…Anna), 2013, Oil on Linen, 45 x 32 cm

Oliver Osborne, Otto, 2013, Frutta, Rome

Oliver Osborne, Rubber Plant, 2013, Oil on Linen, 45 x 32 cm

  • 10 October – 16 November 2013

    Frutta is thrilled to present ‘Otto’ – the first solo show at the gallery by London-based artist Oliver Osborne. The show is composed of a number of new large works alongside a series of smaller scale paintings on linen. The paintings utilize the language textbooks and their humorous explanatory images. He applies a series of screen-printed images, familiar to any user of beginner’s language text book, upon monochrome, and often multi-panel, canvases. The vacant fragmented canvases have removed these pictorial references from their original context, devoid of any supporting material, placed in some form of limbo – almost emblems of the exact transitionary period from one language to another.

    In addition there is also a series of delicately intimate paintings of rubber plants, which are softly lit. In some of them, similar fragments of cartoons are juxtaposed on top; the result is as perplexing as navigating your way through difficult to pronounce foreign common phrases. As the viewers eyes ping pong between the background and foreground, fundamental questions are raised – why does the artist place such simple reproductions, which in effect hides such a beautifully crafted image? Are all components of language and image truly equatable? Can one image or text prevail against another? The viewer is left to rationalize which is more important; first or last, original or copy, visible or disguised?